Concert Review: Colonial City Quartet

Last Friday, I took the chance to see a regional quartet based in my hometown, Colonial City Quartet. I’ve been impressed with previous lineups and wanted to see them with their new bass Kim Brown.

  • Testify. Each group member had a solo on this song and the next one,
  • Strong in the Strength. This is a good way to start a concert; it relieves the pressure on any one member to carry the first song or two on their own, and leaves them all warmed up.
  • My Lord & I (Walk This Road to Glory, Children). Most of Colonial City’s songs are cover songs; manager Tim Campbell has told me that they are content to be a regional group, and since they have access to local venues that have never had a Southern Gospel group in, it is the first time many in their audiences hear these songs. This particular concert was at a local mega-church; most of its members had never heard of Southern Gospel, but their seniors pastor brought the group in for their annual Seniors Banquet. (Thanks perhaps in part to the dinner, there was quite an audience, at least 300 and maybe over 400. The sanctuary was pretty filled.
  • I Bowed on My Knees. This song featured tenor David Campbell. Right before the song, he had some sound system issues, but recovered well with this song. It received prolonged applause. (It was the sort of reaction that would become a standing ovation elsewhere, but this audience did not seem particularly inclined to stand, standing only when invited on “Give it Away” and for the patriotic number.) Since the group’s lead singer, Steve Feazel, used to sing tenor with the group, their arrangements are high; he sang the harmony part above David.
  • Pray (“You Can Awake to a Beautiful Morning”). This was a new addition to their program since the last times I’d seen them. It was performed acapella–and performed well. Kim Brown is an excellent rhythm bass; he struck me as the sort who is a good bass now and has the potential to be a great one with a few more years of voice training and experience.
  • Give it Away. This was the Gaither Vocal Band song; during the encore, the group came down into the audience and shook hands.

Intermission

  • Total Praise. I had never envisioned this Talley Trio song as a quartet song until the first time I heard Colonial City do it, but since hearing their rendition I think it’s even better as a quartet song.
  • Journey To the Sky. Classic quartet number.
  • I Pledge My Allegiance. This was the first time I’d heard the group do a patriotic number. I’ve been told by some groups that they sometimes include a patriotic number in their programs since they know that it will sometimes evoke a stronger response than anything else on their program. If they haven’t gotten a standing ovation earlier in the program, a patriotic song will often bring a standing ovation if all else fails. It’s a weird quirk of American evangelicalism that the flag will bring some audiences to their feet when everything else–even the cross, the empty tomb, and Heaven–fails.
  • I Then Shall Live. This was the first time I’d heard them do this song; it’s a good addition to their program.

For more about —and other Southern Gospel news and commentary—follow our RSS feed or sign up for our email updates!

9 Letters to the Editor

Southern Gospel Journal welcomes letters to the editor. We will post the most thoughtful and insightful submissions. Ground rules: Don't attack or belittle groups or fellow posters, or advance heresies rejected by orthodox Christianity. Do keep comments positive, constructive, and on topic.
  1. “Pray (”You Can Awake to a Beautiful Morning”). This was a new addition to their program since the last times I’d seen them. It was performed acapella–and performed well. Kim Brown is an excellent rhythm bass; he struck me as the sort who is a good bass now and has the potential to be a great one with a few more years of voice training and experience. ”

    Sounds like those boys have been to a Melody Boys concert.

  2. A year ago this week I heard them sing “Total Praise” at an all day singing convention. This was Colonial City’s first appearance at this annual event, most of the audience had never heard them before. They absolutley brought the house down with that song. They then proceeded to sing with “Jeursalem”. That was an awsome performance.
    Colonial City is very wise to use their 2 tenors as they are, especially when it comes to selecting “power songs”.
    Along the same lines, I’d like to see them bring back the song “There He Is”. A duet between Steve and David on this song would be a very rousing performance to hear.

  3. The Colonial City Quartet is quite good, but I do have one opinion on how they may improve their overall sound. I feel that both David and Steve are good singers, but I also feel that having them switch back and forth on tenor and lead is confusing to the listener and does not allow them to solidify their sound.

  4. 10 songs? Maybe that is one of the things in Sg that should change. Can you imagine going to see rascall flatts or celine dion and they do 10 songs?

    Less talking , more singing maybe. Did someone else sing and limit their time?

  5. It was an after-dinner thing. (They said toward the end that they were out of time.)

  6. ok.

  7. Daniel, what do you think about them splitting parts?

  8. It’s good in moderation, which is what they did at that concert.

  9. Good point Mark.
    It’s not just them singing less songs per concert than in the past. Like it or not, this seems to be an industury-wide trend that is very popular these days.
    But on the opposite end of the spectrum, I remember reading in Andrew Ishee’s old Singing News article (A Shared Thought……I miss that feature) where he told of a time when John Rulapaugh filled in for the Inspirations on one weekend. John ended up having to learn and sing, in the first night’s concert alone, about 30-35 songs.