CD Review: Don’t Let Me Miss the Glory (Gordon Mote)

Rating: 3.5 (of 5)

Producer: Gordon Mote & Phil Johnson.

Songlist: Adoration; I Know Somebody Who Does; Wake Up Dancin’; Don’t Let Me Miss the Glory; Maplewood Methodist Church; Get Up in Jesus’ Name; Mercy Walked In; All That Noise; I Can’t Even Walk (Without You Holding My Hand); Ain’t Gonna Give Up on God; My Redeemer is Faithful and True; The Other Side of Time; This Life.

Artist Website: www.gordonmote.com

***

Gordon Mote, though blind since birth, started planning piano at age three. He studied music at Belmont University in Nashville; two days after graduation, he joined country singer Lee Greenwood’s band, and played piano for Greenwood for three years (until Greenwood left the road). Mote then went into studio work and focused on being a session pianist until 2006, when he released his debut project, There’s No Place Love Can’t Reach.

After hearing that project, as well as his contributions as a studio musician to various Gaither productions, Bill Gaither hired him as Homecoming Tour pianist after Anthony Burger’s sudden death. Don’t Let Me Miss the Glory is Mote’s first solo project since.

Mote’s website bio lists some of the artists he has collaborated with:

He’s performed on stage with Lee Greenwood, Trisha Yearwood, Tanya Tucker, Bill Gaither and Grand Ole Opry legend Porter Wagoner among others. In the studio, a “who’s who of country and Christian artists” have benefited from Gordon’s gifts, among them Rascal Flatts, Randy Travis, The Martins, Mark Lowry, Trace Adkins, The Gaither Vocal Band and Kenny Chesney.

This variety of influences shows on his project. While it has its Southern Gospel-influenced tracks, its overall musical feel is more eclectic. It includes the Southern Gospel classic “I Can’t Even Walk Without You Holding My Hand,” but it also includes the Steven Curtis Chapman song “My Redeemer is Faithful and True.”

The latter, incidentally, is a song which is well arranged to fit Mote’s style. Mote sings it as a duet with his wife Kimberly, who is an excellent vocalist in her own right.

The project features several other guest vocalists–Allison Krauss (on “Maplewood Methodist Church”), the Gaither Vocal Band (on “Get Up in Jesus’ Name”), the Isaacs (on “I Know Somebody Who Does,”) and the Voices of Lee (on “Adoration.”)

Much like I said in my recent review of Charlotte Ritchie’s latest effort, Mote’s project strikes me as being one where the artist chose the songs he wanted to do and the style he wanted to do them without being particularly fastidious about ensuring that it fits the mold of what a Southern Gospel (or Christian Country, or contemporary) project is supposed to sound like.


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7 Letters to the Editor

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  1. This seems to be one of my brother’s favorite albums. I’ve heard parts of it, and the guy is tremendously talented. Also, if it’s him doing the piano licks in one of the first 2 songs on the Perry’s Look No Further — that is fantastic piano playing. (Whoever it is … Mote is listed on the credits.)

  2. I love this CD. Tons of variety and all done well.

  3. I was honestly surprised by this album. I’ve been a fan of Gordon’s amazing piano skills for some time now, but I wasn’t expecting the vocals to be that good. I think this CD really complimented him and his eclectic musical tastes and variety of talents. I loved loved loved the arrangement of “My Redeemer Is Faithful and True.” What an amazing song! Gordon and Kimberly were great on it. You’re definitely right, Daniel. She has a lovely voice as well. Great review!

  4. …”supposed to sound like.”

    Really?

    Reckon who makes the rules for “supposed…” ???

    Mmmm???

    gh

  5. I would not call it rules. I would call it tradition–years of records, all (er, most) that have stayed within certain limits melodically, lyrically, and musically (in arrangements).

  6. Just came across this old review while browsing through the archives. I feel this project was good enough that it might have deserved at least a little more space…I would say that if you didn’t think it was SG, then don’t bother reviewing it on an SG blog. But if you’re going to review it at all…say a little more! 😉

    I personally thought it was a little uneven but refreshing. I haven’t even heard every song from it, but from what I’ve heard it’s just got a really nice sound. It’s easy to listen to, the music is good, Mote has a nice, smooth, country tenor… what’s not to like? 🙂

    • Time.

      There are only so many hours in a day. I figured something little beat nothing.